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85 Audi UR quattro

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  • Originally posted by finky View Post
    It helps to freeze the bushing and heat up the arm.
    But wouldn't that make them less flexible?

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    • Originally posted by team illuminata View Post
      But wouldn't that make them less flexible?
      thermal shrinkage.

      When i'm doing shade tree mechanic bushing pressing I put the bushings in the freezer over night, and I tourch the part i'm inserting the bushing into. It doesnt always help, but it never hurts.
      Your friend Raven
      92 Corrado VR6t
      05 Audi A6
      90 Miata (because racecar)

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      • This didn't help





        But this did


        [/url]


        Now I just need to order another one from Germany :(

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        • Why a second one? Unless the bushing has failed I bet the "bent" part will push into place upon install and be like new.
          Matt
          DCC #0
          ...we all started out with the same tools dream it, build it, breathe it.

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          • Originally posted by d bot View Post
            Why a second one? Unless the bushing has failed I bet the "bent" part will push into place upon install and be like new.

            It's quite torn up. I don't want to chance using it.

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            • Sorry about the lack of updates. Got distracted by some work related events not the least of which was attending LSPR with our 911 and other assorted old rally cars.


              14695439_1305247436187424_7489908328833138150_n by Team Illuminata Motorsport, on Flickr




              Since I got back I haven't worked on the car but taken every opportunity I could to drive it. This included a funeral, a couple of cars and coffee events, an open house and running to Autozone for parts for our ailing Allroad.


              image by Team Illuminata Motorsport, on Flickr


              image by Team Illuminata Motorsport, on Flickr


              image by Team Illuminata Motorsport, on Flickr


              image by Team Illuminata Motorsport, on Flickr




              I'd forgotten how much I enjoy driving this car and how much attention it gets. I'm going to try to enjoy it as much as possible before it goes away for the winter. It drives very well, is smooth and quiet but does have a slight hesitation under load though it pulls strong. I can figure that out and put the remaining few parts back on this winter. For now LET"S DRIVE!

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              • It’s been another slow project. Who would have thought replacing three diff seals would take this long? LOL

                So we replaced the rear diff mount. The old one came out on the press but the new one only needed a g-clamp and some grease to persuade it home. Fortunately we took pictures so we were able to orient it correctly; or at least the same.

                [img]https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/626/33790166361_fa1be40e49_c.jpg[/img]


                We searched hi and low for a new shaft repair sleeve that was the right size and not made by SKF. You may remember the last one was distorted by it’s own installation tool. Finally settled on one from National but when we opened the box the instructions were from SKF! Anyway we were a lot more wary installing his one and managed to keep it staright by making our own installation tool out of a pipe clamp.

                [img]https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2900/33952116331_acc5c95a01_c.jpg[/img]

                [img]https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2825/33925199202_e8ddd4605f_c.jpg[/img]


                Then we pressed in all the seals, The left one is huge and does not have a shoulder to press it against. We measured the old one’s depth before taking it out and gradually tapped the new one home around it’s circumference till it measured the same all round.

                [img]https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2849/33834311102_f2def2eefd_c.jpg[/img]

                [img]https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2831/33239799554_94f5707d64_c.jpg[/img]


                Then we turned our attention to the diff lock actuator. We used the same Mercedes part we had used for the center diff. We had to drill another hole in the mounting plate as the back hole is in a different place. Not a big deal. We managed to salvage the original yoke and had to tap the Merc actuator shaft to mate up to it. Then we slapped it all together. There’s something magical about operating the diff lock on the bench. Maybe it’s the lack of driving the car.

                [img]https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2850/33721406770_56edcf265b_c.jpg[/img]



                With the diff done it’s time for the tricky bit: sub-frame bushings! We destroyed one last time remember?

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                • Well, the diff project is done, not without with some casualties. Read on……….


                  Our friend Carlos, a venerated old car genius, made a jig for the press to keep everything aligned while pressing in the notorious pair of small sub frame bushings. The large pair went in like you’d hope a bushing went in: easily.







                  Well that didn’t work and we destroyed one $50, only available from Germany bushing. Apparently there is always a 50% failure rate when pressing these in which is why we had a spare!







                  So we gave up with the jig and just used a bolt down the middle and lots and lots of patience. This took several attempts with each bushing as we eye-balled them intensely looking for any sign of them starting to twist.





                  Once they are happy they go in nicely, like you’d expect but the slightest mis-alignment causes them to rotate and if you persist, distort. It was a bit stressful as ruining one more would set us back a month. Once in we soon had the diff mounted in the sub-frame again.







                  Before we could reinstall the assembly in the car we still had one more bit of housekeeping to perform. One rather rough inner CV joint. Fortnately you can still get these from an OE supplier and we were able to work on it still attached to the car, though it was a little dark under there. Once cleaned the old CV joint came off with some elbow grease and a puller.







                  We assembled the new joint on the bench and packed it full of grease.







                  Then drove it home with a drift. They are surprisingly tight on the axle splines.







                  Then we were finally ready to throw this thing back in the car and tighten everything back up










                  Except for the lower control arm bushings off course, which have to be tightened with the car on the ground. Unless you have some BRAID wheels lying around that is. Don’t try this without proper wheels!







                  And of course, don’t forget to put some nice diff lube in it.







                  By then it was 1am so we waited till the next day to take it for a test drive







                  Before returning it to the stable with its friends.







                  Now the car needs an alignment and a tune. Still have some hesitation under load.

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